Medical Marketing Research


Online Doctor Reviews: Getting positive reviews

Online Doctor Reviews:

 

Four Times as Many Patients Peeved About Service & Bedside Manner Than Medical Skills

 

April, 2013 – Unhappy patients who post negative reviews of their doctors on the Internet complain about poor customer service and bedside manner four times more often than cite misdiagnoses and inadequate medical skills as cause for their dissatisfaction, according to a multi-city study of “rate-your-doctor” websites.

 

  • Google+ Logo
  • Yelp Logo
  • Vitals Logo
  • Healthgrades Logo
  • RateMDs Logo

Proof is in the Patients’ Review

Trudging through 3,617 online reviews from Vitals.com, RateMDs.com and Yelp.com, we came across a few comments that were both anecdotal and too good not to share:

“Dr. Y. tried to perform a routine colonoscopy and he pierced my colon. He said that it was his first case in 25 years, and, of course, he blamed my colon…”
“Dr. H. finished the exam in like 30 seconds and said to me ‘Do you think I am showing too much cleavage in this dress? I got it at Mandee!!” She was, BTW, showing too much cleavage…”
“I could get in touch with Ryan Gosling before these people took me off hold/answered my messages/made any contact”
“It turns out that all my results came back normal, but then I asked about my symptoms and she said, ‘I’m not sure, I learned about this in med school, but that was so long ago…’ *GASP* WHAT?!”
“Worst staff. Obnoxious ghetto people. Not a nice office. Doctor himself is very nice. His nurse for delivery, also not nice. Would be better if he surrounded himself with better staff.”
“I have seen an assistant who (while she is very nice) dressed inappropriately and talked nonstop about boyfriends.  Great for a waitress, but not when it comes to my family’s health needs.”
“Dr. B. is a sweetheart, but his receptionist lady is a nasty heifer.”
“Not at all professional looking and comes across more as a hardened porn star than a doctor. The make-up is caked on, hair bleached super white and she wore a very skimpy little outfit when she was examining me. I get it Dr. K. – you’re hot. I guess I just want my doctor to look more like a doctor.”
“Dr. Y. glanced at my breast lump and quickly gave me a diagnosis of ‘cyst’ because I was too young to have anything else. He didn’t even do an ultrasound! Well, it turns out my ‘cyst’ was cancer.”
“Extremely rude and at one point asked us ‘do you want to see your child dead or alive?’ We immediately requested our doctor be called in and threw her out.”
“She told me I was diabetic on the basis of a single blood test result…She told me she ‘tells her patients that to scare them!’”
“While he was dancing around the exam room (literally) he missed my diagnosis. He is a funny guy and should pursue a career in stand-up comedy instead of medicine.” 
“I was 39 weeks pregnant. She did an ultrasound in office, said I had a small baby coming but all was fine. She was wrapping things up and I asked if she checked my water. Her comment was ‘oops I forgot to do that!’ She checks my water and determines there is none–immediately sends me to hospital to be induced. HORRIBLE DOC!”
“He said to stand on my head and walked out. I was floored. Funny thing is that I’d already tried standing on my head to get the stone to go back in to its kidney home.”

 

Results

  • Just 21.5 percent of the low marks cited physician skill as a major concern
  • The biggest source of complaints was perceived doctor indifference and bedside manner at 43.1 percent
  • In close second-place were customer-service gripes, constituting 35.3 percent of the negative reviews
City & Speciality Docs Reviewed Reviews Customer Service Indifference Incompetence Negative Reviews Not Returning
NYC – Internist 50 749 170 127 84 381 121
NYC – OB/GYN 50 1029 130 209 38 377 147
San Diego - Internist 50 396 80 70 57 207 94
San Diego - OB/GYN 50 538 101 158 117 376 74
Austin TX & Denver - Internist 50 321 84 128 78 290 94
Austin TX & Denver - OB/GYN 50 584 113 134 38 285 153
Totals 300 3617 678 (35.3%) 826 (43.1%) 412 (21.5%) 1,916 683 (18.8%)

 

 


Few Doctors Meet Patient Info Needs Online

January, 2013 – Following a January 15 research report by Pew Research Center revealing that 35 percent of Americans use the Internet to figure out a medical condition, an independent survey by Vanguard Communications found that only one-third of physicians in three American cities offer direct website help to health care consumers trying to understand their symptoms. Here’s a breakdown of the findings:

  • 300 urology, orthopedic surgeons and obstetricians-gynecologists with “100-percent patient satisfaction” ratings (as ranked by users on HealthGrades.com) from Boston, Denver and Portland, Ore. were chosen as the physician sample
  • Seven out of ten: The rate of the studied physicians who were part of a website published by either a private practice or a hospital
  • 45 percent, 35 percent, 26 percent: OB/GYN doctors provided some patient-friendly online information 45 percent of the time, while orthopedic (35 percent) and urology (26 percent) specialists furnished less relevant information for consumers
  • 4 percent: The portion of physicians writing blogs on their websites to update patients on research and trends that could affect their health

 By City

By Specialty

Denver (100 surveyed)     Orthopedics (100 surveyed)
Have websites 62% Have websites 71%
Have symptom education 26% Have symptom education 33%
Have blogs  6% Have blogs  1%
Portland (100 surveyed)     Urology (100 surveyed)
Have websites 67% Have websites 59%
Have symptom education 30% Have symptom education 17%
Have blogs  5% Have blogs  2%
Boston (100 surveyed)     Obstetrics/Gynecology (100 surveyed)
Have websites 77% Have websites 76%
Have symptom education 43% Have symptom education 49%
Have blogs  2% Have blogs  9%
Grand Total Average (300 practices)     Grand Total Average (300 practices)
Have websites 69% Have websites 69%
Have symptom education 33% Have symptom education 33%
Have blogs  4% Have blogs  4%